LEONID BLYUM

I am Leonid Blyum, mathematician, biomechanist and developer of the ABR method. The method ABR gives the parent, the opportunity to (re)build the correct relationship between their child’s body and brain so that spontaneous development can take over. I graduated from Novosirsk University in 1992 with a major in mathematical models and complex systems.
My studies involved the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system (biomechanics), especially spinal disorders and joint deformations. In addition, I worked with my father, a physician specialized in the manual treatment of these disorders. Through study and practice, I became convinced that musculoskeletal deformities could be well treated with quasi-static manual therapy. “Quasi-static” because it involves long and gentle pressure (as opposed to often vigorous manipulation). From 1996 to 2000, I taught biomechanics and manual therapy to post-graduate doctors in Moscow. During this time my personal work in the field of scoliosis and other deformities of the musculoskeletal system proved the effectiveness of the quasi-static method. My field of research was then extended to the rehabilitation of patients with neurological damage (often brain injuries) suffering from disorders and deformities of the motor system. Again, the results were conclusive. Our method – Advanced Biomechanical Rehabilitation (ABR) – involves daily work. This is why I decided to teach this technique to parents of children with cerebral palsy. ABR satellites are now operating in several countries. I guide ABR instructors in teaching ABR techniques to parents and other caregivers.

LEONID BLYUM

I am Leonid Blyum, mathematician, biomechanist and developer of the ABR method. The method ABR gives the parent, the opportunity to (re)build the correct relationship between their child’s body and brain so that spontaneous development can take over. I graduated from Novosirsk University in 1992 with a major in mathematical models and complex systems.
My studies involved the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system (biomechanics), especially spinal disorders and joint deformations. In addition, I worked with my father, a physician specialized in the manual treatment of these disorders. Through study and practice, I became convinced that musculoskeletal deformities could be well treated with quasi-static manual therapy. “Quasi-static” because it involves long and gentle pressure (as opposed to often vigorous manipulation). From 1996 to 2000, I taught biomechanics and manual therapy to post-graduate doctors in Moscow. During this time my personal work in the field of scoliosis and other deformities of the musculoskeletal system proved the effectiveness of the quasi-static method. My field of research was then extended to the rehabilitation of patients with neurological damage (often brain injuries) suffering from disorders and deformities of the motor system. Again, the results were conclusive. Our method – Advanced Biomechanical Rehabilitation (ABR) – involves daily work. This is why I decided to teach this technique to parents of children with cerebral palsy. ABR satellites are now operating in several countries. I guide ABR instructors in teaching ABR techniques to parents and other caregivers.